Spot the odd one out Pound Store figure in these version 1 Airfix US Marines from 1963?

Spot the odd pound store figure out amongst the 1960s OOHO Airfix version 1 US Marines featured on my Man of TIN blog post:

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2021/06/07/from-the-halls-of-montezuma-airfix-version-1-us-marines-1963/

It’s a bit like “Where’s Wally?”

Look carefully.

Did you spot him?

Well done!

The only Airfix Version 1 US Marines figure that I didn’t find in my scratch invasion force was the Bazooka man. Standing Bazooka loader yes, Bazooka man no.

Bazooka man as seen here in Plastic Soldier Review Airfix US Marines version 1 review http://www.plasticsoldierreview.com/Review.aspx?id=355

***The kneeling loader figure is a damaged US Version 1 Marine, too fragile to repair the rifle, so a few scalpel cuts left him with a Bazooka round instead, kneeling to avoid enemy fire.***

However I knew I had multiple US Infantry Bazooka men from an early 2020 recent pound store purchase.

Just a few dozen Bazooka men, then!

See my July 2020 post here for different ImagiNations ways of painting these Airfix copies
https://poundstoreplasticwarriors.wordpress.com/2020/07/13/tell-that-to-the-pound-store-plastic-marines/

These pound store figures are either small copies of the Airfix 1/32 US Infantry or those familiar poses which were scaled down by Airfix themselves to make up part of the newer version mid to late 1970s Version 2 US Marines (still available at Airfix.com or stockists)

Airfix Version 2 US Marines https://uk.airfix.com/products/wwii-us-marines-a00716v

And finally, a strange Bazooka name ‘fact’ …

The Bazooka got its name from a strange jazz instrument invented or played by US comedian Bob Burns.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bazooka_(instrument)

Robbie Burn’s Bazooka” in The Evening World, New York, September 3, 1919. Wikipedia source

The resemblance of the M1 anti-tank weapon to this odd wind instrument probably led to its Bazooka nickname.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bazooka

Blog posted by Mark Man of TIN, 8/9 June 2021

ImagiNations Vintage Airfix figures #1 Black and Gold Washington’s Army Tricorne Troops

Airfix Washington’s Army (S39, first produced 1971) are a versatile set for ImagiNations use. Sadly they are currently unavailable and have not been widely produced since the early 1980s.

I wanted to keep the bold colour schemes and paint style that I found in an old battered bag of Airfix and assorted figures.

How they arrived:

How these Airfix arrived … paint flaking off flexible parts like legs and weapons

https://poundstoreplasticwarriors.wordpress.com/2021/05/20/imaginations-obes-and-vintage-airfix-scrapings-from-someone-elses-toy-box/

The Accurate Revell AWI British troops were even less finished.

The random flag came with the bag of figures but I’m not sure which of the many colourful groups of figures it belongs to; it matches the uniform colours anyway.

Figures with round MDF bases are recently gifted Duchy of Tradgardland origin troops from Alan Gruber, which I have painted to match the others. Thanks Alan!

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2021/05/27/turncoats-and-mercenaries

As they arrived from Tradgardland, left hand side.

Their origin is inscribed in fine point indelible CD marker underneath – figure number and origin e.g. D of T. This makes for easy stock-keeping, honours the gift or origin and also helps with personalised wargaming.

Yellow and Black?

Like a swarm of wasps or angry bees? The starting original yellow tunic colour is well matched by the vibrant Lufthansa Gelb (Yellow) 36-310, the silk matt Revell Aquacolor Acrylic that I used.

Who could they be?

1. It also gives me a possible Mittel Mittel European ImagiNation or FMS Forgotten Minor State (Principality, Electorate, Empire or Duchy etc) of Gelberg. Gelberg is named after its yellow-tinged rocks and mountains glimpsed above the forest line (a bit like Golden Cap near Lyme Regis).

The name Gelbania is already taken by another of my (post) Napoleonic era FMS ImagiNations.

2. Alternatively the black, white and gold could be a regiment of Kernewek or Cornish Guards in British or ‘foreign’ service, hence the ‘redcoat’ facings. There are Irish, Scots and Welsh Guards, why no Cornish ones? These are led by one handsome Captain Russ Dolparke.

3. Some other bright (yellow) idea …

Pigtails and Details

As I painted, I noticed more and more fiddly details – straps, the powder horn and its thin straps, the tie back buttons, cockades, the pigtail and ribbon. These are well detailed figures for their time, ones that have aged well too.

Checking through Uniforms of The American War of Independence (Blandford) as suitably Tricorne era, I noticed that the British and American troops did not all have white wigs and pigtails, below the senior officer level.

Some left-over figures, possibly intended to be standard bearers, will serve as gun crew as needed.

The odd figure with a (gunpowder?) barrel is actually an awkward chimera that I made of two damaged figures, part French Artillery legs and Washington’s Army body.

You could spend forever tweaking paint on straps etc. I decided against a dark wash to bring out details, as I wanted to keep close to the simple fresh paint scheme on the figures from the original random bag.

There are some beautifully painted and highlighted examples of Washington’s Army online including on the Paul’s Bods blog site.

Blog posted by Mark Man of TIN 3 June 2021.