More Dumb Soldiers in the Garden – The Clean Up Operation Begins

IMG_3514

I have been busy this week working on some wounded lead soldiers and horses.  Whilst waiting for recast arms and heads to arrive, I spotted this pile of metal detecting finds on sale online.

A couple of pounds later,  a tiny parcel arrived and as I cleaned them up, I posted the online auction picture to see what  battered lost treasures and delights my blog readers could spot in the pile.

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2018/05/06/more-dumb-soldiers-missing-in-action/

Some of my blog readers were pretty accurate in their view of what was in this earthy pile of broken lead. They variously identified:  a bronco cowboy, an old toy racing car, a weird gnome, highlanders in kilts and guardsman. Well spotted!

IMG_3525
The toy soldier and sailor figures before clean up. Fragments of red coats of old enamel paint have survived on some. Possibly a section of a Johillco pilot (bottom right) and Crescent airman or Marine Officer with swagger stick (top right) 
img_3527.jpg
The animals from Cococubs to cowboys  and a beautiful fox.  An imp, a broken  Native American Indian and part of a petrol pump add to the strange mix. Many of these smaller objects will be put into a display box frame. 

The strangest of the lot was a metal dwarf or garden gnome figure. It might even be Father Christmas with the red paint?

IMG_3526
A strange gnome type figure, an old toy racing car and an ornate broken thing … this is a job for Bagpuss! 

As I cleaned the dry earth from inside and out, I recognised some broken bits as fragments of old lead toy soldier figures that I have in my collection by Britain’s and other makers.

Where I could, I checked them against my originals.

IMG_3530
Battered but common Britain’s Greandier Guardsmen firing (set 34) late 1930s to mid 1960s and marching (second grade fixed arm New Crown range figure No. 41P) 
IMG_3531
The bashed remains of two Britain’s sailors, with traces of blue paint, compared with my intact Royal Navy Blue Jackets No49N (second grade paint) based on the fixed arm Royal Naval Reserve figure (1907 – 1940). On the right, a Crescent airman with swagger stick. 
IMG_3532
Colonial and Khaki Highlanders – John Hill / Johillco (centre) and Britain’s (right) Khaki Highlander 34N second garden finish (with surviving traces of Khaki paint) compared with complete examples in my collection. 

I use Gloss Acrylic paints and will eventually varnish the figures to get that old toy soldier look.

As I began to clean ready for undercoat and painting, I started on some simple traditional repairs using glue, wire and matchsticks.

IMG_3550
Britain’s Guardsmen and sailors get an undercoat along with  the wood and wire start of new rifles and legs. 
img_3551.jpg
Highlanders and unknown Guardsman torso get their new legs. 
IMG_3553
New bases from Fimo, ready to paint sap green and mount on tupenny (2p) pieces for a bit of weight in the base. Two Britain’s Guardsman from the metal detectorists collection,  alongside two Broken Britain’s figures given to me by  John Forman. 

Repairs may not be pretty but they are designed to be robust, using what materials I have to hand, and aiming to get these lovely figures fighting on the tabletop or in the garden again soon.

Another order of recast heads from Dorset Soldiers will be required soon to finish these figures.

I shall post pictures of the completed figures, like RLS’ poem The Dumb Soldier,  back from the earth when suitable new recast heads arrive.

A very satisfying few days of tinkering and mancrafting.

Blogposted by Mark, Man of TIN, Bank Holiday weekend May 5 / 6 2018.

 

 

Advertisements

Pound store 42mm conversions

Attractive 42mm pound store plastic conversions by  Rob Young on the Eastern Garrison website  https://easterngarrison.blogspot.co.uk/2018/05/1897-playing-at-converting-chinese.html

Saluting Donald Featherstone’s Centenary

IMG_3227
A small 54mm plastic parade for Donald Featherstone on his Centenary.

Celebrating Donald Featherstone’s Centenary on 20 March 2018

Donald F. Featherstone (1918 – 2013)

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2018/03/03/featherstone100-donald-featherstone-centenary-20-march-2018/

Blogposted by Mark, Man of TIN, 20 March 2018.

More Dahomey Amazons

 

IMG_3166

IMG_3171
UNESCO series on Women in African History PDF

 

You can download this PDF graphic novel free at the following UNESCO website:

https://en.unesco.org/womeninafrica/sites/womeninafrica/files/pdf/The%20Women%20Soldiers%20of%20Dahomey_Women%20in%20African%20History_Comic%20Strip_0.pd

IMG_3167
An unusual parade …

IMG_3168

IMG_3169

An interesting graphic novel about the Women Warriors of Dahomey, produced by UNESCO as part of their Women in Africa project or resources.

IMG_3170
French colonial forces arriving against the Dahomey Amazons

I have previously posted about these female warriors and made the start on some Pound store plastic soldier conversions

 

https://poundstoreplasticwarriors.wordpress.com/2018/02/15/colonial-amazons-women-soldiers-of-dahomey-and-siam

Interesting Dahomey flags https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dahomey_flag_1889.svg

I have temporarily mislaid my pound store conversions of plastic soldiers into Dahomey Amazons but will eventually finish them. I don’t know of any current manufacturers of Dahomey Amazon gaming figures.

IMG_3061

 

Blogposted by Mark, Man of TIN 10 March 2018

Pound Store Snow Troops

IMG_3135

36mm  Pound Store Plastic Warriors in the snow and ice today.

Inspired by the Tradgardmastre of the Duchy of Tradgardland

http://tradgardland.blogspot.co.uk/2018/03/winter-in-medieval-tradgardland.html

More on snow and ski Troops on my other blog:

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2018/03/02/snow-and-ski-troops/

Blogposted by Mark, Snow-Man of TIN, 2 March 2018.

 

Pound Store Skirmish Part 2

It’s been a week or two since I started this skirmish game and today I had the chance to conclude the final moves.

The story or scenario so far of my 1:1 skirmish game using pound store plastic warriors converted into colonial infantry and natives – photos and blogpost 1

https://poundstoreplasticwarriors.wordpress.com/2018/02/03/pound-store-colonial-skirmish-part-1/

The native spearmen attacking from the ridge on the right had done serious damage to the numbers of Redcoats relieving the Gatehouse patrol.

It was fairly obvious that the Redcoats would be unable to hold out at the Gatehouse to the Pass for long against the massed native rifles on the ridge.

Turn 4

Once most of the native spearmen had been dealt with, the cleverest solution for the Redcoats was to run for cover beneath the ridge that the native riflemen were on or remain across the other side of the valley beyond rifle range.

Turn 6

By Turn 6, many of the Redcoat troops had perished in the melee fighting against the Native Spearmen, leaving mostly the militia rifles to attempt to reinforce or rescue the Highlander patrol at the ruined Gatehouse.

Turn 7

Turning the gaming board round to get my painting seat back in action, this time we are looking from the native rifle positions on the left ridge down the valley.

Turn 7 to 11 saw the Militia and remaining Redcoats reach the Gatehouse. Several Native Riflemen left the ridge to attempt to cut off the retreat of the Militia but were fought off in melee.

Redcoat orders: What to do on this confused situation with so few men?

A d6 dice roll sorted this out. 1-3 retreat, 4 occupy Gatehouse or 5-6 attack the native ridge.

The Redcoats and Militia rolled to retreat, aiming to return with reinforcements. They remained below the ridge or out of rifle range. Their flag or colours were safe.

The Redcoats and Militia retreat out of rifle range.

The surviving Redcoats, rescued Highlanders from the Gatepost and the Militia halt out of rifle range. The heliograph operator flashes back a request for reinforcements.

Likewise the natives rolled for their next action and also retreated, melting away from the ridge to watch from the hills.

A most satisfactory game, albeit a game that soon proved unwinnable for the Redcoats after the heavy losses against the native spearmen. It proved interesting enough despite being shelved twice, played over three short occasions, all part of the convenience of a portable game board and of solo gaming.

It was a joy to finally be handling figures that I had been converting and painting for many previous weeks. It was the good looking game I had been working towards and envisaged. I liked the Old School / Featherstone / Wells look of the game and of the rugged desert Heroscape Hex terrain.

Blogposted by Mark Man of TIN on Pound Store Plastic Warriors, 25 February 2018.

Poundland Figures 36mm or 1:48 scale?

 

IMG_2416

Exploring the whole thorny issue of scale and size, I am curious about whether these Poundland 36mm figures are close to 1:48 scale.

I found this on the 1-48 Tactic website: http://1-48tactic.com/game.htm

What 1-48 means and how big are these figures?
1:48 is an exact scale, it means that the scaled models are 48 times smaller than the actual size of the real object.

It is sometimes referred to as quarter scale because a quarter inch represents one foot and is equivalent to the model trains 0 scale in USA (note that in the UK 0 Scale is more commonly 1/43.5 or 7mm to the foot and in the rest of Europe 0 Scale is 1:45 !).

Tamiya and other scale model makers offer a wide selection of military vehicle models and figures in this scale and there a number of ready to play die cast models available too. (1-48 Tactic website)

This is useful to know, even though I don’t think I have any 1:48 scale materials. There will be plenty of bashed ones online.

An average standing man in 1:48 scale is approximately 36mm tall, 1-48TACTIC figures are therefore fairly close in size to the commonly called 32mm (when measured to the eyes) or “heroic scale” wargame figures, but are more realistically proportioned. (1-48 Tactic website)

Other websites also suggest that 36mm high figures like my Poundland plastic warriors are  similar to 1:48 scale. Big Lee’s Miniature Adventures BLMA website http://www.blmablog.com/p/scale-guide.html   suggests that:

1/48 is 33.5mm to eye line, 36mm to scalp, equivalent to US O Gauge which is 0.25 inches to the foot and referred to as “quarter inch scale”. Popular for plastic aircraft kits (Tamiya). (Translated from a table on BLMA website)

Wikipedia suggests that https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1:48_scale is also (close to) the scale of Lego Minifigures! I checked and the Lego figure looked a little bigger to the head top / scalp.  “At this scale, 1/4 inch represents 1 foot. It is similar in size to 1:50 scale and 1:43 scale which are popular for diecast vehicles.” Quarter inch scale is mentioned again.

..IMG_3201

On its https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rail_transport_modelling_scales article it mentions that many rail enthusiastsfreely intermix “mix 1:43 scale, 1:48 scale and 1:50 scale die-cast models with 0 scale model trains.”

The Miniatures Page TMP website article on scale seems to agree that somewhere between 1:43 and 1:48 scale is about 35/36mm and also O Guage,  This is useful to know  if I need some railway components to my figure gaming. Unpainted O gauge or 1:48 civilians for railways sold en masse also offer  conversion figure possibilities. http://theminiaturespage.com/ref/scales.html

IMG_2512

Tamiya 1:48

Tamiya 1:48 kits have been mentioned several times and I checked their website. Figures appear about 36/37mm, so slightly taller than my Poundland plastic warriors (35/36mm) and obviously far more finely detailed. There are tanks, planes and a few useful battlefield accessories. http://www.tamiya.com/english/products/32512g_infantry/index.htm

Doll’s House scale 1:48

1:48 seems to be a dolls house size as well,  with some rather fine and expensive accessories

http://www.atriflesmall.co.uk/148th-scale/148th-scale-castle-and-fantasy

And some attractive figures but not in the Pound Store Plastic Warrior budget price range,  the waitress figure for example is 37mm.

http://www.atriflesmall.co.uk/148th-scale/148th-scale-dolls-and-figures/148th-scale-metal-figures/148th-metal-waitress-1839

Malcolm’s Miniatures models has 1:48 scale wall and paving moulds for air drying clay (Das) which look very useful at £5 each. Presumably it works with FIMO too.   http://www.malcolmsminiatures.co.uk/1%3A48+moulds

http://www.malcolmsminiatures.co.uk/Brick+impress+moulds

Blogposted by Mark Man of TIN March 1st 2018