Milk Carton Creation No. 1 – Cheap Landing Craft

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My previous post showed these clever recycling craft kits (stickers?) from Flying Tiger with ideas for reusing cartons.

https://poundstoreplasticwarriors.wordpress.com/2019/07/21/cheap-flying-tiger-canal-boat-landing-craft/

This is the day and this is the hour …

My first Milk Carton Creation is a simple Landing Craft for 54mm figures down to 40mm or even 32mm figures.

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I sketched out an idea of the shape of the Landing Craft on the side of the carton with a permanent marker Sharpie pen, before cutting with sharp scissors.

Folds and cuts are first secured by staples. Later on I used a hot glue gun to fix flaps and wooden coffee stirrers for rigidity and strength.

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The end cap section was removed and reinserted elsewhere as the machine gun cupola.
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Staples can be seen along with a cocktail stick radio mast.

Next time I make one of these, I will not lose the thin screw on ring that was attached or sealed to the cap. It might make the cupola tidier to insert and secure.

I used Revell Aquacolour Acrylic (Stone Grey) which binds to the shiny waxy carton both inside and out  well enough. I shall give this a further coat or two of Stone Grey paint. A final tough gloss varnish spray should protect some of the paintwork.

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I tested the landing craft in the water and it does still float, thanks mostly to not having an opening front door flap section.
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The back splash and bullet  guard is made of a plastic card  iTunes voucher.

The back splash and bullet guard is made of a cut up plastic card iTunes voucher, the flaps or hatches from thin wooden crafting Scrabble squares and cardboard – all secured with a hot glue gun.

I can add more detail such as fenders and life rings and lettering after a few more coats of paint.

Inspiration for the Landing Craft came  partly from the Flying Tiger catalogue page and partly from the back and review pages of Toy Soldier and Model Figure or TSMF Magazine this month.

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My Landing Craft (Carton)  –  A fraction of the price and tough enough to game with in the garden,  compared to the more delicate King and Country model version.  
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The machine gunner’s Cupola / gun shield was partly inspired by these Vietnam War APCs.

In keeping with my Pound Store Plastic Warriors blog ethos of cheap and cheerful, recycling and reusing scrap and plastic tat, here are some suitably Pound Store Plastic figures to give me an idea how the Landing Craft works.

The plastic figures are mostly unpainted and Pound Store clone or pirate copies of Matchbox,  Airfix or BMC US marines.

First off, a Normandy D-Day type Landing with mostly pirate Pound Store copies of Matchbox German infantry and US infantry. Barbed wire, sand bags and beach obstacles from Elite Corps (space marines) playset.

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The Grey Defenders – Mostly Matchbox figure German Infantry or Africa Korps 54mm-ish copies atop the granite cliffs.

The same scenes in grainy black and white:

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Hit the beach, fellas!

Meanwhile somewhere in the Pacific …

Several tubs of what I later discovered were Pound Store copies of BMC Marines also had the odd Japanese lying figures, to bolster the defences of mostly Pound Store Matchbox and Airfix Japanese on this more tropical but strangely familiar shoreline.

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I bought about 5 drums or tubs of these BMC Marines copies at  the seaside for 50p a tub!

Those well-defended  tropical beaches in grainy black and white:

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I thought I would also try the Landing Craft out with some lead hollowcast  figures of US infantry from the family on Fathers Day:

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The cupola Navy machine gunner is a copy of a plastic Tim Mee infantry machine gunner.

Finally I tried the Landing craft out with smaller scale 32mm pound Store figures and similar size toy jeep.

Switching figure scales, the machine gunner in the lid appears too large for the smaller scales. This is not always so important with plastic toy soldiers. Just look at the weird scale mix in Pound Store Soldier bags.

In future however on my next Landing Craft (Carton) I shall try keeping the milk carton round lid and cutting down and sticking on the suitable size machine gunner figure, so that with a couple of spare carton lids, I can have an easy swap or switch of figures.

Hopefully I can add some suitably Pound Store type scrap details like fenders and life ring along with some Letraset style letters and numbers.

A few less cartons to landfill if you have no carton recycling nearby. All I need now is dozens more and I can invade (a pound Store version of) France …

Blogposted by Mark ‘Man of TIN’ and Carton, 21 July 2019

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Design ideas from the Legendary Woodscrew Wargames Army

For anyone who tried and failed to make Paddy Griffiths / Andy Callan Hair Roller armies from the early issues of Miniature Wargames c. 1982/3, an article which surfaces again on blogs from time to time – its ‘Fess up time. I tried and failed the fiddly bits like guns, horses and limbers.  

As hairdressing was one of our family trades, the disappearance of large numbers of hair rollers would soon be noted. After cutting up one or two, I got bored with these tiny (2mm?) armies but still have these remnants “to help me remember” (in the words of Mr. Benn). 

I notice the Wargaming pastor has also been fiddling around with 2mm armies recently.  https://thedeathzap.wordpress.com/2019/07/08/weve-had-6mm-fantasy-how-about-2mm/

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The remains of my hair roller armies alongside a few 1/300 Heroics and Ros ancients.

 

My original article is here with brief mention of rollers:

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/07/30/miniature-wargames-magazine-milestone-issues-1-and-400/

So as a result I was delighted to see this diagram again by Andy Callan from Miniature Wargames no. 9 on Tony Adams’ blog recently:

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Others were more successful than me in their hair roller Army building http://flownlegions.blogspot.com/p/blog-page_15.html

When hair roller armies are mentioned, there is often also talk of a near legendary painted metal screw army idea from the 1960s. The idea was first featured  in an early Miniature Warfare Magazine in 1969 – and I have been chatting by email to an inventive and handy man called Tony Adams who has quietly over the last 50 years been building up a vast wood screw army.

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Tony has been cataloging and photographing new additions to his forces, in the form of some clever scratch built vehicles such as GS wagons, artillery and 3D printed machine gun sections, using everyday materials like balsa wood, tooth picks and drawing pins. His blog is well worth a look through at https://thewoodscrewminiaturearmy.blogspot.com

Tony reprinted the  original 1969 article in Miniature Warfare by K.F. Jones that started it all:

https://thewoodscrewminiaturearmy.blogspot.com/search/label/Miniature%20Warfare%20Magazine

The full article can also be seen on Vintage Wargaming http://vintagewargaming.blogspot.com/2009/06/hyper-miniature-system-by-k-f-jones.html

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Tony Adams’ simple bowsers and logistics of balsa and drawing pins – clever!

The scratchbuilt limbers, GS wagons and other support materials are well worth looking at and have given me some ideas for the future for my Peter Laing 15mm figures. There is also some clever 3D printing: https://thewoodscrewminiaturearmy.blogspot.com/search/label/3D%20Printing

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A website well worth a browse.

All pictures / screenshots of his website posted with Tony Adams’ permission.

Blog posted by Mark Man of TIN, 19 July 2019

Pound Store Scout Figures from Airfix WW1 Americans

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Some simple Scout figures knocked up quickly from Airfix WW1 Americans.

 

I have been painting in the garden today for the first time in many years. In the past, painting outdoors kept me safe from being cooped up inside in a room amidst the heady fumes of Airfix enamels and glue.

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As an experiment, some of the more useless poses (lying down etc.) in the  Airfix WW1 American troops have been adapted to become Scouts for my Wide Games Project.

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The skipping picnickers or  ammunition carriers from Airfix WW1 American infantry repainted as Boy Scouts for Wide Games.

One possible source of Scout figures for Wide Games are the Airfix WW1 Americans with their doughboy / lemon squeezer hats. Their puttees look a little like long Scout socks and their tunics like Scout blouses.

When I was a boy, WW1 Airfix figures were no longer in the shops by the late 1970s and so were very hard to get hold of. I made do with what precious few WW1 figures came down through the family.

They have since been rereleased in the 2000s by Hat and more recently by Airfix themselves in their Vintage Classics range.

http://www.plasticsoldierreview.com/Review.aspx?id=498

https://www.airfix.com/uk-en/shop/figures/airfix-vintage-wwi-us-infantry.html

The old ones are in green, the Hat ones I think are the ones in Sandy brown.

The idea of hacking up precious WW1 Americans to make Scout figures still seems a little odd, so I have used the more ‘non combatant’ poses.

These include the famous skipping doughboys with their picnic hamper, the doughboy sat on a box, the usually useless dying casualty and the lying down but not firing figures.

Falling over guy and lying down guy, alongside originals.

The figures still need painting in suitable Scout uniform colours, with painted details added of scarves, shorts and long socks.

Clipping rifles off and replacing these with wire patrol staffs or staves should help demilitarise these figures.

Classic skipping doughboys and Rovering to Success pose, with originals

Hot glue gunning to a base makes the more useless lying down poses stand in a more useful manner.

Smaller scale Scouts?

For my Wide Games Project, suitably wide terrain, suitable ground scale and size of figures are an obvious issue. Going smaller means that my hex board becomes a bigger territory. However there are not many old fashioned Scout Hat type figures.

The advantage of these HO / OO or 1:76 WW1 figures is that they should link with HO or OO type railway figures and buildings.

http://www.plasticsoldierreview.com/ShowFeature.aspx?id=107

Peco Modelscene Uniformed Services, hikers and Scouts Trek Cart set

Scouts and trek carts are available in railway figures but they are usually few in number and expensive or in more modern Scout gear. Preiser also do a set of very European or Germanic looking Scouts.

Peco Modelscene Trek Cart and Scouts

The Dapol (former Airfix) passengers and railway staff / navvies etc should provide some inexpensive suitable country characters.

https://www.dapol.co.uk/shop/model-accessories/self-assembly-oo-kits

Lots of possibilities for a larger scale Wide Games using OO railway size buildings and scenery that I already have (sounds like material for my Sidetracked blog https://sidetracked2017blog.wordpress.com

Blog posted by Mark Man of TIN, 1970s Cub Scout (Bronze Arrow, Retired)  on 22 June 2019

Close Little Wars Simplified

Crossposted from my Man of TIN blog

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2019/06/15/close-wars-simplified/

A blog post all about American gaming librarian Jen B using simplified Featherstone rules with simple plastic 54mm figures to attract young or new entrants to the figure gaming hobby:

Photo by Jen B of her D-Day 75 simple drop-in library game.

Blog posted by Mark Man of TIN, Regular (Library User) and 70s Airfix kid 15 June 2019.

Geek Pride Day 25th May

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Just one of this last year’s pound store distractions to be proud of …

Crossposted from my Man of TIN blog, celebrating my Man of TIN 3rd blogaversary and Geek Pride Day:

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2019/05/25/happy-geek-pride-day-and-its-my-3rd-blogaversary-25th-may-2019/

BBC Archive (@BBCArchive) Tweeted:
It’s #GeekPrideDay. Here’s a Heart of the Matter clip about fantasy role-playing games, broadcast #OnThisDay in 1980 https://t.co/Y9HDGrXiw0

 

P.S. It’s not My Pound Store Plastics Warriors  blogaversary, that’s in September 2016.

Enjoy whatever your Geek is today!

Mark, Man of TIN the Glorious 25th of May 2019

Pound Store Plastic Boy Scout 32mm Conversions

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Some very rough and ready Boy Scouts – my Pound Store Plastic ‘penny dreadful’ figures 32mm conversions (with metal 42mm range LBB30 Little Britons Boy Scout figures in the background including Girl Scout conversions) 

As one source of scout figures for Wide Games, you can always convert cheap plastic figures from pound stores such as I have done with these 32mm plastic figures.

To read more about how this was done, read the post from my main Man of TIN blog:

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2019/05/19/pound-store-and-homecast-boy-scouts-on-the-painting-table/

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Staves at the Ready: Be Prepared! 32mm Boy Scouts in the BIG outdoors. 

Girl Scouts in their fullish Edwardian Skirts could also be produced in the same way as I adapted metal Boy Scout figures https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2019/05/17/wide-games-and-the-early-girl-scouts/

Crossposted from my main Man of TIN blogsite where there is a Scouting Games Wide Games summary page 

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/wide-games-scouting-games-page/

Crossposted by Mark Man of TIN (1970s Cub Scout, Bronze Arrow, Retired) on 19 May 2019.

Recycled Fridge Magnet Bases

Recycling old fridge magnets into magnetic base strips for toy soldier storage boxes …

I found a small cache of these old disused flexible fridge magnets being thrown out at work, so before they were binned, I snaffled or scrounged them (with permission).

I have recycled them into either figure basing strips or the magnetic strips on the bottom of toy Soldier storage boxes, as the magnetic polarity ‘thing’ goes.

After peeling the shiny advertising paper label off, they are thin enough to easily cut with scissors. This has saved a pound or two on magnetic self adhesive tape and also saved a tiny patch of landfill.

Blog posted by Mark the scrounging Man of TIN on 12 May 2019.