Pound Store Plastic Figure Conversions into 54mm Boy and Girl Scouts

Usually I post my Pound Store cheap plastic figure conversions onto this Pound Store Plastic Warriors blog here first but have recently set up this Scouting Wide Games for the Tabletop blog especially for this Scouting Games project.

When you need some cheap 54mm plastic Boy and Girl Scouts, what else can you do but convert the cheapest figures you can find? Read and see more at:

Paratroop Officer into Maud The Scoutmistress

https://tabletopscoutingwidegames.wordpress.com/2019/10/17/turning-cheap-pound-store-army-figures-into-boy-scouts-and-girls-scouts/

Crude cheap modern and WW2 figures into 54mm Scout figures

Blog posted / crossposted by Mark Man of TIN (1970s Cub Scout, Bronze Arrow, Retired) 17 October 2019.

Advertisements

Close Little Wars Simplified

Crossposted from my Man of TIN blog

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2019/06/15/close-wars-simplified/

A blog post all about American gaming librarian Jen B using simplified Featherstone rules with simple plastic 54mm figures to attract young or new entrants to the figure gaming hobby:

Photo by Jen B of her D-Day 75 simple drop-in library game.

Blog posted by Mark Man of TIN, Regular (Library User) and 70s Airfix kid 15 June 2019.

Unboxing Box No. 4

 

13060C08-1B79-4B9D-957C-9A7234ACBDD2The YouTube and internet phenomenon that is the unboxing video is still a bit of a puzzle to me.

Different from a finished, made-up kit review or playset review, this is watching someone unpack their latest present or purchase. Unless you want to see what is in a particular box set, it could be pretty dull.

However unpacking a bits box or job lot of Broken Britain’s figures (not just Britain’s but of all makers and scales) is a genuine rummage into the unknown. In the words of Forrest Gump about Life as a box of chocolates, “you never know what you gonna get.”

I received as presents from the family four shoeboxes of toy soldier odds and ends that I had stowed away for Christmas, some old, some new, some red, white and blue (two packs of the BMC Yorktown 54mm figures).

Box number 4? I took a bit of a gamble bidding £30 or so on this small child’s  suitcase of mixed toy figures, having glimpsed one or two interesting figures.

What treasures can you see?

7C653488-61EC-4FEA-ABB7-241A08A8CB4D7B6B535B-9FAA-4B89-A974-010B7A7860F2

40075782-58A0-4167-8722-115B4B253C14
Ebay Screenshot – glimpses of toy town treasure? Some figures clearly broken.

I spotted a  Wendal aluminium Toytown soldier figure or two – including the hobbyhorse for the Toytown Officer but was the Officer included and unbroken?

This could have been a box of brittle decaying plastic tat.

I was pleasantly surprised – this box of surprises formed box number 4  of my Christmas toy soldier presents.

Share with me this owl pellet of figures and toy bits, as I unpack this scrappy bits and bobs and scrapings of someone else’s toy box.

619EB6AE-523F-4D73-9F3B-EE442441AB02
A hollow plastic rhino and damaged metal Bison for repair. 54mm scale.
B772E065-4F54-4EB3-A3E0-53829707C8AB
Great plastic Pterosaur with folded wings and metal 54mm grey gorilla (Charbens or Cherilea?)
B3C98AFE-1D1E-4D60-A814-E705FAD680B5
One solitary metal penguin …
4C86B517-1032-4990-9A04-5F80A5B4721C
Plastic 54mm foxhunter and five hounds. Hilco Plastic? Possibly worth the whole bid price?
3F1ACD14-0201-4B80-91BA-7C6EA71EBDE9
Small 54mm scale farm animals, mostly lead and some grubby flocked examples of pigs and sheep. Damaged metal Roydon 1950s windmill.
33A6A2C4-05AF-461A-9E7E-B056159DB695
Three beautiful large lead animals, one damaged for repair and a plastic grazing horse
6F49FDA2-9A3B-44D2-8C8F-331536270A4F
50-54 mm Farm workers, numbers 1 Crescent farmhand  and 3 are metal.  Roydon metal sign post and (Roydon?) well. The other figures  are plastic, the farmer (an unmarked copy of?) an early Britain’s Herald type with moving arm.
93663A09-47C3-45D1-A6BE-175388AA6C25
Two 54mm Roydon blacksmiths or farriers and anvil.
9F0323E4-9230-416E-A1BE-7B07DE5CC165
Small lead or metal trees and bushes.
EE3108AC-A1CA-49F4-95B3-6881922448E9
54mm Metal cowboys needing repair. First two Timpo, last three Britain’s.
2930EF81-BC3D-49F9-B78E-DAC1DFA8950A
54mm metal  cowboy and horse to repair. This lead horse with a broken leg thankfully won’t get shot by me as the Lead Vet of the Remount Department.
98E4B706-4958-44D2-8F59-712629405932
More bashed and broken 54mm lead American Indians to repair. First two Johillco. Third from left Reka? Last two Britain’s second grade paint.
05BB9272-0AC4-466E-8A1D-789C41760BEF
A variety of sizes of Cowboys and Indians in colourful plastic, the largest Crescent (left) and Lone Star (right) 54mm.
F67D6FF9-CB1E-442A-847E-2843C855DBAA
A metal doghouse, garage, railway and farm bits and bobs.  Mixed  scales, plastic and  metal.
38C9A720-E7BE-4A07-915D-BD2A8D02B31E
Fences, small scale figures and a little red Charbens  phonebox with opening door and …
B740F0FE-AD3B-49E9-BA60-B522BC65EAB1
… A glimpse of the phone shelf inside the Charbens phone box. This phone box is potentially worth more than the bid price of the box of figures.

I was a bit worried that I had bought an expensive box of broken and brittle plastic tat but this unbroken  little red phone box seems to be worth more (based on other ebay listings) than the suitcase worth.

B9276AE2-E244-4761-8A8C-6AE581F34B9F
Plastic green  zoo fencing and metal wagon ends and fences.
7692F725-F2C3-47F1-A223-4356E9704568
Lead (Second figure from the left) and plastic modern or WW2 figures, 54mm to 60mm – stylish and lively poses. Lone Star Harvey no. 1, 5, 6 and the magnificent 7th!

I still find it exciting and interesting to find new figures that I don’t have or have never seen for real.

Before job lots or individual figure sales online, it was difficult to affordably find such figures, locked up in a slightly older generation’s toy boxes and biscuit tins in the loft.

This fascination probably dates back to the mid 1960s when my late Dad bought a box of odds and ends random plastic figures from the family next door for our family toy box, their boys having outgrown them. Some of these were always at odds with our staple Airfix 54mm figures. Many were mysterious because they were no longer in the toy shops. Some of the larger 60mm cowboys and Beton WW2 were an oversized oddity, less used. However the different handfuls of a few 54mm figures by Crescent and a handful (literally) by other manufacturers such as Lone Star  Harvey became some of my elite troops and command figures.

5C6FD114-6B46-4F4E-A291-5ADC7CB7B0F1
Some of the brittle breaking 1960s plastic 54mm for possible repair? Cherilea.
F7F36CFE-23F8-41A8-A86B-EF2A37C39195
An attractive small red metal canoe with 30mm plastic Indians
61DB0F7E-7FD7-44E3-ABE6-DD2A44EC2182
The scrapings of someone else’s toy box? Metal Buffer, plastic pen topper, pilot or driver figure etc. I vaguely recall having such a pilot / driver but can’t think for what toy.

 

E41D3259-5458-47F3-BA44-52BE39299018
There was a Toytown  Officer and his horse in aluminium by Wendal and the rifleman (with bayonet intact) to join two bashed others in my collection.

The two Toytown figures again, if bought separately online, are worth more than I bid for the suitcase of figures. The child’s small suitcase that it all came in is useful for storage.

I hope you enjoyed sharing with me the joy of discovery. There are  some useful figures and bits and bobs for the gaming table along with some more interesting figures for rotating into my few wall mounted display cabinets. Figures off such  ‘parade’ duty go back into those stout plastic Really Useful boxes for a rest.

Hope you enjoyed this Pound Store Plastic Warriors blog unboxing blogpost.

Posted by Mark Man of TIN blog on Pound Store Plastic Warriors, March 2019.

More Washing of The Spears

4D9ABE02-E04F-4A05-B406-92D66511EF79
A right colourful bath tub mix up of 40 to 54mm figures …

Over the last few weeks I have been spending a bit of Christmas money on eBay, picking up the kind of cheap plastic figures you don’t normally see in UK toy stores. A few pounds here and there.

Being either new-ish secondhand or sometimes a whole  chocolate tin of mixed figures, the scrapings of someone else’s toy box with some tantalising glimpses of unusual figures, they all need a good wash before painting. It should remove any grime and mould release chemicals.

With so many figures,  the sink wasn’t an option so the bath tub stood in this time.

Here was the washing up bowl  ‘spa treatment’  I did last time, back in June 2016:

https://manoftinblog.wordpress.com/2016/06/17/spa-treatments-for-toy-soldiers/

33135777-1E28-4D42-89BA-FD72481CD45E
Drip drying en masse in an old beach or bath toy net …

To dry so many, I rigged up an old beach toy net (commonly used for storing bath toys) and they  all drip dried pretty quickly.

Next job is sorting them all out … an exciting mixture of modern plastic 40 to 54mm soldiers, pirates, redcoats, ninjas, fantasy figures male and female  – and skeletons which sank.

I shall post photos of each group in the next few posts.

Blogposted by Mark Man of TIN on 2 February 2018.

 

Hex marks the spot (or six pirates for a pound yo ho)

No toy soldiers in the pound store today. However I found these rough looking characters in a local covered market stall for baking and cake decorations.

I enjoy finding unusual sources of figures like this, adding some variety to the usual figures.

Palm trees £1 each by Flying Tiger, six Cake Dec pirates for a pound (local market)

Hex marks the spot?

Figures are about 50 to 54 mm base to head, marked on the back ‘China’.

They are made in flesh tint hard plastic, crudely but colourfully painted to adorn a pirate cake.

Six colourful pirates for a pound! Proper piratey poses amongst the figures including a pegleg and crutch, parrot on shoulder carrying a treasure chest and another with shovel to bury it.

One has a knife carried in the teeth, keeping hands free for climbing the rigging and there are plenty of cutlasses amongst them. Good Treasure Island material here.

One of them with an oar looks like a girl pirate. They were all mixed in with the usual Cake Dec box full of sports people, so ‘she’ might really be a sporty female rower.

Figures like these can of course be repainted to make bandits, navy crews or other irregular troops.

Some interesting piratey poses to repaint and add to my plastic pirate skirmish gaming box.

The blue coated captain looks like he has a broken sword or pistol.

He was the only of this pose available. Should be an easy repair.

Huzzah for cakes of piratey death! Fifteen men on a dead man’s chest, yohoho and a bottle of rum … and all that.

Figures repainted this winter ready for more desert island duelling? Sadly the age old family sand pit is no more.

https://poundstoreplasticwarriors.wordpress.com/2017/04/26/duelling-in-the-sandpit-lunge-cut-and-stop-thrust/

Blogposted by Mark Man of TIN on Pound Store Plastic Warriors, 7 September 2018

More Fun for Less – Party Favor Plastic Cowboys and Indians

A good toy slogan to have “More Fun for Less.” These funexpress.com Made In China Cowboys and Indians have a couple of interesting poses, some of which echo the familiar Airfix and Britain’s Deetail Cowboys and Indians.

They were ordered online from a UK “party favors” shop, an interesting but sometimes expensive place to find plastic figures.

They are marked MARIES 0415 funexpress.com on the base. They were £3.60 including postage, so 36p each.

The plastic figures are slightly larger than the usual 54mm figures but close enough, the last picture gives a size comparison with similar Britain’s 54mm lead hollowcast figures.

Two of the plastic figures alongside a Britain’s hollowcast lead cowboy and repaired Indian.

I look forward at some point to painting these in Gloss toy soldier style.

Blogposted by Mark, Man of TIN, 20 July 2018.

Wilko Wild Western Express

Vintage 54mm Pound Store Plastic Cowboys and Indians fight over the cargo and caboose of my new Wilko Western Express train.

A snip of a plastic battery operated railway set at £10. Read more at:

https://sidetracked2017blog.wordpress.com/2018/07/14/the-wild-wilko-western-express/