Unboxing Box No. 4

 

13060C08-1B79-4B9D-957C-9A7234ACBDD2The YouTube and internet phenomenon that is the unboxing video is still a bit of a puzzle to me.

Different from a finished, made-up kit review or playset review, this is watching someone unpack their latest present or purchase. Unless you want to see what is in a particular box set, it could be pretty dull.

However unpacking a bits box or job lot of Broken Britain’s figures (not just Britain’s but of all makers and scales) is a genuine rummage into the unknown. In the words of Forrest Gump about Life as a box of chocolates, “you never know what you gonna get.”

I received as presents from the family four shoeboxes of toy soldier odds and ends that I had stowed away for Christmas, some old, some new, some red, white and blue (two packs of the BMC Yorktown 54mm figures).

Box number 4? I took a bit of a gamble bidding £30 or so on this small child’s  suitcase of mixed toy figures, having glimpsed one or two interesting figures.

What treasures can you see?

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Ebay Screenshot – glimpses of toy town treasure? Some figures clearly broken.

I spotted a  Wendal aluminium Toytown soldier figure or two – including the hobbyhorse for the Toytown Officer but was the Officer included and unbroken?

This could have been a box of brittle decaying plastic tat.

I was pleasantly surprised – this box of surprises formed box number 4  of my Christmas toy soldier presents.

Share with me this owl pellet of figures and toy bits, as I unpack this scrappy bits and bobs and scrapings of someone else’s toy box.

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A hollow plastic rhino and damaged metal Bison for repair. 54mm scale.
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Great plastic Pterosaur with folded wings and metal 54mm grey gorilla (Charbens or Cherilea?)
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One solitary metal penguin …
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Plastic 54mm foxhunter and five hounds. Hilco Plastic? Possibly worth the whole bid price?
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Small 54mm scale farm animals, mostly lead and some grubby flocked examples of pigs and sheep. Damaged metal Roydon 1950s windmill.
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Three beautiful large lead animals, one damaged for repair and a plastic grazing horse
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50-54 mm Farm workers, numbers 1 Crescent farmhand  and 3 are metal.  Roydon metal sign post and (Roydon?) well. The other figures  are plastic, the farmer (an unmarked copy of?) an early Britain’s Herald type with moving arm.
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Two 54mm Roydon blacksmiths or farriers and anvil.
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Small lead or metal trees and bushes.
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54mm Metal cowboys needing repair. First two Timpo, last three Britain’s.
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54mm metal  cowboy and horse to repair. This lead horse with a broken leg thankfully won’t get shot by me as the Lead Vet of the Remount Department.
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More bashed and broken 54mm lead American Indians to repair. First two Johillco. Third from left Reka? Last two Britain’s second grade paint.
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A variety of sizes of Cowboys and Indians in colourful plastic, the largest Crescent (left) and Lone Star (right) 54mm.
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A metal doghouse, garage, railway and farm bits and bobs.  Mixed  scales, plastic and  metal.
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Fences, small scale figures and a little red Charbens  phonebox with opening door and …
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… A glimpse of the phone shelf inside the Charbens phone box. This phone box is potentially worth more than the bid price of the box of figures.

I was a bit worried that I had bought an expensive box of broken and brittle plastic tat but this unbroken  little red phone box seems to be worth more (based on other ebay listings) than the suitcase worth.

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Plastic green  zoo fencing and metal wagon ends and fences.
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Lead (Second figure from the left) and plastic modern or WW2 figures, 54mm to 60mm – stylish and lively poses. Lone Star Harvey no. 1, 5, 6 and the magnificent 7th!

I still find it exciting and interesting to find new figures that I don’t have or have never seen for real.

Before job lots or individual figure sales online, it was difficult to affordably find such figures, locked up in a slightly older generation’s toy boxes and biscuit tins in the loft.

This fascination probably dates back to the mid 1960s when my late Dad bought a box of odds and ends random plastic figures from the family next door for our family toy box, their boys having outgrown them. Some of these were always at odds with our staple Airfix 54mm figures. Many were mysterious because they were no longer in the toy shops. Some of the larger 60mm cowboys and Beton WW2 were an oversized oddity, less used. However the different handfuls of a few 54mm figures by Crescent and a handful (literally) by other manufacturers such as Lone Star  Harvey became some of my elite troops and command figures.

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Some of the brittle breaking 1960s plastic 54mm for possible repair? Cherilea.
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An attractive small red metal canoe with 30mm plastic Indians
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The scrapings of someone else’s toy box? Metal Buffer, plastic pen topper, pilot or driver figure etc. I vaguely recall having such a pilot / driver but can’t think for what toy.

 

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There was a Toytown  Officer and his horse in aluminium by Wendal and the rifleman (with bayonet intact) to join two bashed others in my collection.

The two Toytown figures again, if bought separately online, are worth more than I bid for the suitcase of figures. The child’s small suitcase that it all came in is useful for storage.

I hope you enjoyed sharing with me the joy of discovery. There are  some useful figures and bits and bobs for the gaming table along with some more interesting figures for rotating into my few wall mounted display cabinets. Figures off such  ‘parade’ duty go back into those stout plastic Really Useful boxes for a rest.

Hope you enjoyed this Pound Store Plastic Warriors blog unboxing blogpost.

Posted by Mark Man of TIN blog on Pound Store Plastic Warriors, March 2019.

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Author: 26soldiersoftin

Hello I'm Mark Mr MIN, Man of TIN. Based in S.W. Britain, I'm a lifelong collector of "tiny men" and old toy soldiers, whether tin, lead or childhood vintage 1960s and 1970s plastic figures. I randomly collect all scales and periods and "imagi-nations" as well as lead civilians, farm and zoo animals. I enjoy the paint possibilities of cheap poundstore plastic figures as much as the patina of vintage metal figures. Befuddled by the maths of complex boardgames and wargames, I prefer the small scale skirmish simplicity of very early Donald Featherstone rules. To relax, I usually play solo games, often using hex boards. Gaming takes second place to making or convert my own gaming figures from polymer clay (Fimo), home-cast metal figures of many scales or plastic paint conversions. I also collect and game with vintage Peter Laing 15mm metal figures, wishing like many others that I had bought more in the 1980s ...

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